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GIOFESTThe Galearthéan Institute Of Flat Earth Science & Technology
Read our Mission Statement

Whilst all GIOFEST articles picture the international Flat Earth map within their headings, this is merely a common publishing style of Flat Earth blogging communities.

The official GIOFEST logo, as found on our main front page, is actually a pictogram of three simple characters.

An underscore, followed by a Star, followed by a wavy line, as follows:

_*~

This pictogram represents with most simplistic beauty, our flat plane, the majestic sky above and the sea which doth embrace us.

Our philosophy encompasses the practise of minimalism, patience, truth and understanding.

Live for each other, relinquish ill necessity, create goodness within and bring it forthwith unto the world.

~ Simon Jepps, GIOFEST

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Egyptian Grandmaster

Egyptian Grandmaster by Simon Jepps
Egyptian Grandmaster by Simon Jepps (©2004)
When I was in my twenties I started making minimalist ink sketches, with black ink on white canvas.

I still have a few in my collection, including a Certificate Of Sacred Art, awarded to me by Armando Farina, an Italian art instructor who happens to have known and even painted with Picasso.

The ink sketch which won the 1st place award is now lost somewhere amongst the art institution’s endless archives. However I can tell you it portrayed an eternal connundrum, of an artist drawing himself in an Italian park, drawing himself in an Italian park, drawing himself… etc.

Whilst I may never get that one particular picture back, here is one of the first drawings I ever made, titled ‘Egyptian Grandmaster’.

You can find all artworks from this collection under the category: sejink.

Xaphoon by Zariah

Xaphoon by Zariah ArtHere is a wonderful painting created by a female artist in Maui, Hawaii, who goes by the name Zariah.

As far as I am aware, this piece is actually called “Riddle”, but what draws one’s attention is the unique instrument tucked under the boy’s arm.

Without doubt, a Xaphoon, since the artist herself is from the exact same region where Brian Wittman invented it back in 1972.

This picture is actually a cropping of a much larger work of art, featuring this loveable but mischievous boy, having a laugh amongst the gardens with his friends.

Strikingly, he reminds me of Peter Pan, yet more to the point, if the Pocket Sax had actually been invented during J.M. Barrie’s lifetime, would the Xaphoon have then been the actual flute of Peter Pan?

Looks fairly conclusive to me.

Zariah Art