Bishop Follying: French Defense

Bishop Follying French Defense
French Defense
Diagram 1
{2. … d5}
The purpose of Bishop Follying is sometimes misunderstood since it harbours concepts such as dual-coloured Bishops and hidden ulterior strategies. To the untrained eye, it may be difficult to perceive how Follying a Bishop may be more useful than Follying a Knight.

Yet as I am about to show you, this post studies a well known Opening which is actually tailored by design to embrace the Bishop Folly with open arms.

I trust this article will explain and clarify to you, why the practise of Follying is indeed the next evolution of Chess.

The French Defense is often considered to be a successful opening, but due to its infamous light square Bishop being unable to enter the game for some time, it receives a similar amount of criticism.

Yet in this post I am going to comprehensively demonstrate how Bishop Follying revolutionizes the French Defense unto a newfound superiority.

(more…)

Follying, or; to Folly

Follying in Missionary Chess
Follying in Missionary Chess
Missionary Chess features a new specialty called Follying, whereby the Mission’s adjacent Bishop or Knight may be relocated to the Mission’s home square in the same turn of the Mission first vacating.

This is notated quite simply with the move of the Mission followed by the follied piece in brackets. For example, as a very first move of a game, we could write, Mh3 (N).

A piece may not be follied if it has already made its first move, or if the adjacent Mission has already vacated.

To perform a Folly, first make a regular move with your Mission, and then in the same turn, place either the adjacent Knight or the adjacent Bishop onto the home square of the Mission, now vacated.

(more…)