Jengaagain

Jengaagain By Simon Jepps
Jengaagain ~ The next evolution of Jenga
You thought Jenga was cool… now YllwChlk brings you Jengaagain!

After playing Jenga for many years I did nevertheless become rather tired of its limitations in design.

Oh I agree that its purpose is to bring a minimalistic forte of recreational entertainment into the home… but that was just it, the game was too basic.

Eventually, following a small tantrum involving a swooping arm and a very disappointed stuffed monkey on the other side of the room, I started about designing the next evolution of the game Jenga.

I experimented with many different kinds of constructions and building algorithms, even multiple towers and installations.

Yet in the end, I believe quite strongly, to have hit the jackpot.

So here it is… Jengaagain.

(more…)

The Evolution Of Chess . Com

The Evolution Of Chess - Official WebsiteYllwChlk would like to make a quick momentary announcement, to inform you of our official website launched to promote The Law Of The Folly and the next generational leap of Classical Chess.

TheEvolutionOfChess.Com

This website was created to provide a referenceable frontpage for studies and as an easily memorable web address to share amongst players.

Thank you.

Chess Follying © Simon Jepps

Wallooning

WallooningThe sport of Wallooning involves the application of two or more strategically adept individuals into a challenge of water pistols and balloons.

The rules are very simple.

Each player must try to keep their own balloon airborne by shooting at it each time it begins to descend towards the ground.

If a player’s balloon touches the ground then that player loses the round and the opponent is awarded one point.

However, players may also shoot at each others’ balloons in attempt to burst their opponent’s balloon.

If a player’s balloon bursts then that player loses the round and the opponent is awarded one point.

Additionally, players may also shoot at each other. This is considered an advanced tactic, which when employed decisively, can completely ruin your opponent’s chances of success.

Beware however, shooting at your opponent may not always produce the desired result.

A bonus point is awarded to any player who successfully fires his own balloon into his opponent’s, providing his own balloon does not burst during the collision.

Note; doing this is not a sign of affection and may instead cause you undue stress.

Each game lasts five, six, seven or eight rounds. Occasionally it can stretch to nine or ten rounds.

During the hot seasons players may keep going all day long until they can no longer see their balloons, either because it is now too dark, or because they are too sloshed to see clearly.

In any case, there are definitely rounds, but certainly no cubes.

Wallooning was invented by Simon Jepps one summer in 2018 whilst watching aeroplanes flying in squares above his house.

He still drinks Banangerang.

Bishop Follying: King’s Indian Defense

Bishop Follying King's Indian Defense
King’s Indian Defense
Diagram 1
{4. … d6}
At first glance it might not be very obvious why Follying a Bishop, rather than a Knight, may be useful.

After all, two Bishops of the same coloured square can be a dicey combination. Then again, on the other hand it might be just what you need.

In any case, dual-coloured Bishops are not a foregone result, since there are more Follying options for a Bishop than there are for a Knight, such as when Castling, and herewith the ease to replenish the balance.

This article is not intended as an in-depth Opening study, yet I would like to demonstrate how firstly, Follying is extremely useful as a method to free a Queen or even a King from a Knight shackled against it.

Secondly, this article demonstrates how Follying a Bishop can prove very cunning, particularly whence your opponent is caught offguard, and highlights how dual-coloured Bishops can deliver a very strong blow.

(more…)

Chesster

The “Chesster” is a new playing piece designed to revolutionize the Classic sixtyfour square game of Chess.

Invented by Simon Jepps in 2018, the special quality of this piece resides in its superiority over its predecessor the ‘Jester’ and its enlightening evolutionary development into a majestically mesmerizing force upon the Chess board.

Furthermore, it is hailed by its inventor as the eureka solution to an evergowing historical problem of how to create a compatible new piece without altering the Classical sixty four square game.

(more…)

Cobra Paw Dragon

cobra paw dragon by simon jeppsA variation of Cobra Paw by Simon Jepps.

The game of Cobra Paw Dragon is played in very much the same way as classic Cobra Paw, except the following.

  • A maximum of two players assume their places about the arena.
  • Each player chooses one of two symbols as his own, suggested by the roll of both dice.
  • All tiles are snatched and scored as per usual except whence you snatch your opponent’s symbol by mistake.
  • For any tile snatched carrying your opponent’s symbol is surrendered to the opponent and thence… turned upside down.
  • The upside down tile scores double, or 2 points and may not be snatched again ~ so look out!
  • The tile carrying the symbol of both opponents scores thrice, or 3 points and can be claimed by either player.
  • BEWARE, if a player rolls a double of his own symbol, that tile also scores double, or 2 points AND if snatched by mistake, is turned upside down scoring quadruple, or 4 points.
  • “No touchy” law applies throughout.

NB:~ There are two styles of Dragon…

  • Dynamic: The player chooses a different symbol each round, from the two suggested by the dice, in order to increase confusion.
  • Straight: The player keeps the same symbol every round, but only if the dice permit, reducing confusion but receiving an extra 5 points at the end of the game.

The dice must suggest a symbol to choose or keep. If the dice do not suggest the same symbol thrice, the player cannot thrice keep it.

A pen and paper is required to keep score and to mark down each player’s symbol for each round.

Kudos to Karen Arnold for the Dragon.