Chessatya Solitaire

Chessatya Solitaire by Simon Jepps
Chessatya Solitaire by Simon Jepps
Aye, the game of Chessatya is not merely a pastime of spiritual recreation between friends, but is also a pastime of spiritual recreation with God.

Whilst the philosophical history behind Chessatya’s creation is one of peace, reconciliation and understanding, Chessatya Solitaire is in fact also a unique philosophical practise completely in and of itself.

As the name suggests, Chessatya Solitaire is indeed a game played solitary. Yet whence thine solitude is one spent meditating with God, thence Chessatya Solitaire is a game shared also with God.

Whilst it is not unusual for Western Chess players to partake in ‘solitaire’ games by themselves, these are in all rationality, only for Opening and positional studies.

For in Western Chess your only opponent is either a real living person or an artificial intelligence simulation.

Chessatya Solitaire is on the other hand a much more sentimentally intimate encapsulation of a “virtual” companion.

That is to say, Chessatya Solitaire embraces through the Dice, the abstract concept of a supernatural opponent. You could call this opponent ‘Karma’, ‘Chaos’ or even ‘God’. Yet for the passionate dedication and purpose for which this game was designed, we will call our companion ‘God’.

Thus the spiritual practise of Chessatya Solitaire is the assertion, proclamation and ascension unto complete honesty and adherence unto God.

This is a game then, of intellectual honesty and an exercise of solitary morale.

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Chessatya ~ Of Kings & Time

⊰ Introduction

Chessatya by Simon Jepps
Chessatya by Simon Jepps
Chessatya is a combination of the two words “chess” and the Hindi word “satya” meaning ‘truth’. Thus, “chess in truth”.

The game of Chessatya is a carefully crafted and passionately finetuned transposition of ancient Chaturanga unto modern Chess. It could be described, not as the next evolution of Chess, but as the next revolution of Chaturanga.

The philosophical story behind this game is that, in order for two Christian Kings to resolve their differences and determine who, if either is most righteous, they need to summon the power of time and space through the employment of a Hindu Vimāna.

Thus the message or ‘prophecy’ of Chessatya, is that one must surrender unto the greater enlightenment of all good faiths, in order to find true salvation.

Hindu Vimāna are mythological flying palaces or chariots described in Hindu texts and Sanskrit epics. The Pushpaka Vimāna of the king Ravana is the most quoted example of a Vimāna.

Vimāna are historically documented, sometimes in exquisite detail and are believed to be likened to spaceships, or eternal chariots of both space and time.

Chessatya passionately embraces the Vimāna as a foundational counterpart to the spiritual functionality of this game.

Yet before we open our Chessatya treasure trove and reveal all that this majestic game has to offer, it is important to share with you some of the philosophy that invoked its creation.

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Zploj

Zploj Ingredients By Simon JeppsHere is an old timer recipe of mine which has served its dues for many years.

Ingredients:

  • 1 can of Baked Beans
  • 1 can of Chicken Korma
  • 3 large free range eggs

Cook the Baked Beans and Chicken Korma in separate pots until they are all sloppy and ready. This takes 5-10 minutes.

Be sure to wet the empty Korma can with some water and to swoosh it around inside. Do this with your hand cupped over the top of the can for a thorough swoosh.

This is important in order to retrieve left over residue and to provide the Korma with some moist sauciness.

Finally towards the end, get three Eggs frying in a saucepan, best fried in butter. Traditionally the Eggs should be sunnyside up and somewhat runny.

To serve, basically “zploj” the cooked inventory onto your plate, but in separate places so you can pick and taste the different flavours as you “mange”.

Best served with a side helping of fresh buttered bread and Coca-Cola.

I hope you enjoy!

Cha’nga

Chaturanga
Chaturanga is the sacred origin of a pastime
Rekindling an ancient pastime, by Simon Jepps.

Cha’nga, pronounced “shangaah”, is a version of Chaturanga, which allows just two players to employ the classic four armies.

I invented this game because I know as much as people love Chaturanga, its inconvenience is the requirement of four players.

Creating an understanding as to how only two people can play, in turn sanctifies its misunderstood silence, revealing instead its diversity and adaptability to all walks of life.

But first a truth.

However you interpret history, there is no avoiding the fact that “Chaturanga” literally translates as “the four arms.” It comes from “chatur”, meaning four, and from “anga”, meaning arms.

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