Sax In My Pocket

Pocket sax jeppsOriginally a lounge Pianist, yet forever intimidated by its inconvenience of size, expense and formality, I found myself in a passionate love affair with a new instrument.

Invented in 1972 by Brian Wittman, a Hawaiian musician, guru and gentleman, the Xaphoon®, more popularly known as The Pocket Sax, is a Trumpet sized Saxophone, that not only fits in your pocket, but whence the dedication and mutual embrace is spoken, will turn your mind inside out as it screams the blue soul of a real Saxophonist.

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Saxpet

Xaphoon pocket sax simon jepps tutorial
Saxpet ~ Saxophone, Clarinet & Trumpet
Subconsciously, whilst I will always refer to the Xaphoon as the Pocket Sax, it has always been in my heart to call it my “Saxpet”.

This is not merely because it feels like a mutually adoring “pet”, but in a technical sense also.

Brian Wittman, the instrument’s inventor, describes the Xaphoon as a combination of, or more accurately the middle ground between, the Saxophone and the Clarinet.

Yet whence having played the instrument at volume in an orchestral Jazz setting, in particularly the hard and indestructible resin model, you feel it to absorb and harness the strong energy of the brass instruments being played.

Indeed to say, the Trumpet.

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Mission Pocketable

Pocket sax tutorialSome could argue the Xaphoon to be much like a Ukulele, in that its size deems it flawed by design. Yet there are many Ukulele players who are obviously not dissuaded by this, indeed myself occasionally included.

No, the Xaphoon is not flawed. It is however, very difficult to master. Oh, this is not to say the average novice will be unable to enjoy it, no, this is to say that the average professional Xaphoonist would have spent ten years perfecting it.

The difference between a Xaphoon and a Pocket Sax…? Bamboo die hards aside… depends how good you are.

First things first. I know what you are seeking. The sound of a Sax in your pocket. Yet you fear it to only raspberry, much like a Kazoo. This is a common misconception, seeded by poor examples of play, by amateurs trying too hard, as if to make a baby iron a suit.

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